The Red and Yellow and the Tufted.

The cloud last night meant that the night started warm, making it good for moths, at least until the heavy rain set in. The catch in the moth trap was large in number, although with no particular rarities. The most spectacular species did not even make it into the trap, it was a red underwing that was resting on the wall of the Education Centre.

red underwing

red underwing

I know it does not look that spectacular, but it is a very big moth and when it flies about it shows red and black hind-wings, which you cannot see here as they are covered when it lands.

The brightest sighting of the day was a group of sulphur polyphore brackets on a felled log, this is an especially spectacular species and large with it.

sulphur polyphore

sulphur polyphore

A look out over Ibsley Water showed that there are still lots of coot and a fair variety of other wildfowl, including a teal, 2 pochard and several families of tufted duck. These typically don’t appear until after mid-summer, unlike mallard which often have duckling even before winter is completely out. The family int he picture was resting on the shore outside the Tern hide this afternoon.

tufted duck family

tufted duck family

The only other sighting of any note that I made was of a single green sandpiper, also on Ibsley Water.