30 Days Wild – Day 20 – A Leopard

Back at Blashford and checking the moth trap I found it contained a leopard moth, these strange moths have larvae that eat wood. They tunnel into the stems of living trees and shrubs, typically in branches and take two or three years to grow to sufficient size to pupate. The moth was rather battered, they are a moth which doe snot seem to stay in good condition for very long.

battered leopard moth

leopard moth

It seems I missed one in much better condition in the trap in Monday, although the books say they are quite common this is a species I do not see every year, so two in the week is good for Blashford.

There a a fair few other moths, but nothing of great note and the only other one that I had not seen so far this year was a tiny micro-moth.

Caloptilia populetorum

Caloptilia populetorum

I am not sure if I have seen this species before, it’s larvae eat birch so you might think is would be common and widespread, however it seems to be quite local. Clearly there are many other factors that influence their distribution.

After a morning at Blashford I had to go over to Fishlake at lunchtime. I was meeting with members of the Trust’s grazing team about getting some of their British White cattle onto the reserve to help preserve the varied fen vegetation. The fields look very attractive with purple loostrife, comfrey, meadow sweet, common meadow-rue and much more.

meadow rue with tree bumble-bee

common meadow-rue, with tree bumble-bee

If the meadows are so good you might ask why graze them? The answer is to keep them in this state. Years without grazing have seen them start to scrub over in places and become more dominated by very tall vigorous species, shading out the lower growing plants.

The tree bumble-bee hovering to the right of the picture is one of the more distinctive bumble-bees, with a brown thorax and black abdomen with a white tail end. This is a recent colonist of the UK arriving at the turn of the millennium and being first found in Southampton. As far as we know it crossed the channel unaided and has now travelled up the country as far as northern Scotland and west to Ireland.

What’s in My Meadow Today?

It was warm and sunny when I arrived home and a quick look in the meadow revealed lots of insects, best was a skipper butterfly, my first in the garden this year.

Essex skipper on wild carrot

Essex skipper on wild carrot

The Essex and small skipper are very similar, best separated by the black underside to the tip of the antennae. The picture seems to show they are present on this one making it an Essex skipper.

 

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Would you like Lime with that?

We over-wintered some pupae, mostly of emperor moth, but also a couple of others. I confess I did not know for sure what they were. One looked like a hawk moth and it turned out that it was a female lime hawk moth, as it emerged yesterday morning.

lime hawk female

lime hawk moth female

The moth trap was very quite, with only five moths, but these included a freshly emerged male lime hawk moth and a very brightly coloured one.

lime hawk male

lime hawk moth male

Although there were not many moths in the trap I did find a very beautiful, tiny moth running about on vegetation beside the Centre pond, remarkably I managed to get one, more or less in focus shot of it, although I have yet to be happy I have identified it.

micro moth

micro-moth

Out on the reserve there has been a lot going on recently. The volunteers have been hard at work building a whole new fleet of tern rafts thanks to funding from the Hampshire Ornithological Society (HOS). By the end of Thursday we had eight rafts in two sets and I am pleased to say that we already have ten pairs settling on them with others about. So far I have  had no chance to get a picture of them, but I will try again over the weekend.

Although Blashford’s tern colony is one of the smallest in the county, it is consistently the most productive, with each pair regularly fledging more than two chicks each year. Over the last ten years we have produced about 450 chicks to flying stage, since our colony is still only about 25 pairs, so most of these must now off nesting elsewhere, probably topping up struggling coastal colonies.

Other news is that the next stage of work on the former Hanson concrete block works has started, eventually this area will be absorbed into the reserve allowing direct access from the main car park to the Goosander and Lapwing hides without crossing the road or significantly doubling back on yourself. We hope to have the access open by the autumn.

I am still trying to identify be many bees that can be seen around the reserve using the excellent new guide, some are difficult though. One thing that looking at a different group of creatures does, is open your eyes to just how many there are, once you start looking there are bees of lots of different types all over the place! Below is a picture of a very small one I came across yesterday, still not sure if I will be able to identify it though.

little bee 2

small bee sp.

 

A New Species!

One of the things we do at Blashford is to record species that occur on the reserve, this builds up a picture of what species we have and what management we might need to do to encourage the ones that are either rare or particularly reliant upon the reserve. To this end one of the groups we record regularly are moths, having done so for many year snow new species are a rare occurrence nowadays, but yesterday we found one. Admittedly in this case I tis probably a migrant sop not on that will change our management in any way, but interesting all the same. It was a micro-moth and actually quite a rare one in Hampshire with never more than five recorded in any year and those usually on the coast. This distribution is a clue to the fact that they are probably all migrants arriving from the continent. This year has seen quite  arrange of migrants from the south, although we are still awaiting the really huge numbers of silver Ys that can occur in a migrant super-year. Although small the new species is rather smart.

Oncocera semirubella

Oncocera semirubella

We have been rather busy in the last couple of days so picture opportunities have been few, but I did get a close-up picture of the business end of a horsefly on one of the picnic tables as I had lunch yesterday.

Horsefly, business end

Horsefly, business end

Only the females bite, this one is a female and the apparatus below the head is the biting bit! They do have splendid eyes though.