Taking Stock

Things have been relatively quiet at Blashford recently, although also very busy! Quiet in that we are in a time when the breeding season is more or less over and the migration season has hardly started.

Overall the bird nesting season was a mixed story. Resident birds mostly started late, the snow in March set them back. The migrants were mostly late arriving, with some in lower numbers than usual. It seemed that migrants that come from the SE were much as usual but those that take the West African route were down. Having arrived most small birds relished the warm weather with lots of insects to feed their young and seem to have done well. Resident species have had a more mixed time, single brooded species such as blue tits have done well, multi-brooded worm feeders like blackbird and song thrush have had a harder time.

Overall it has been a bumper season for insects, in the main they all do well in a hot summer a hot summer, although those that use shallow wetlands are probably finding things difficult.

six-spot burnet

six-spot burnet moth

As the breeding season ends we are starting to see some migration, swift are leaving as are the young of the first brood of sand martin and adult cuckoo have all gone. The first waders are coming back from the north, green sand piper and a number of common sandpiper have been seen on the reserve.

Yesterday a party of 7 black-tailed godwit flew south over Ibsley Water, they were in full breeding plumage and showed no sign of moult, so I would guess they were newly arrived from Iceland. If conditions are good they will make the flight in one go, arriving at a favoured moult site such as one of the harbours on the south coast. Once they get here wing moult starts almost straight away.

Further signs of approaching autumn are rather larger, at Fishlake Meadows 2 osprey have recently been seen perched up in the dead trees, one carries a blue ring, apparently ringed as a nestling in Scotland.

The prolonged hot weather is taking a toll, a lot of trees are losing their leaves in an attempt to reduce water loss, some will lose branches and as the ground dries one or two are falling. Perhaps surprisingly it is often trees growing on usually damp sites that are suffering the most. Easily accessible water in typical times mean they have not developed such large or deep root systems and are more vulnerable in drought conditions.

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30 Days Wild – Day 18: Hotting-up

Sunday and it certainly was a day of sun and one to try and stay out of it too. We were due to visit Wisley Gardens but before we went I had a look around our garden and found a male broad-bodied chaser perched on a dead stem in the border.

broad-bodied chaser

male broad-bodied chaser

We went from our modest suburban plot to the manicured expanse of the RHS gardens. As we have a perennial border I am always interested to see what the borders in these large gardens are growing. I am a fan of very big plants so am always on the look out for new ones, especially Umbellifers, which are usually good for insects. I was especially impressed by one huge one, when I checked the label I realised it was a plant I have growing as a seedling in a pot and here it was with towering 4m high flowering stems.

It was so hot that it was quite difficult to stay out in the more open areas, it was not only the people that were feeling the heat and in a shady grassland I came across a white-legged damselfly perched up out of the sun.

white-legged damselfly

white-legged damselfly