30 Days Wild – Day 27 – On the Marsh

The majority of my day was spent at one of our occasional staff meetings, a chance to catch up with what other members of staff have been doing, learn about the projects and discuss future direction. Despite their undoubted value, it is often difficult to be sat indoors on a fine day, although on such a warm day being in the shade was not that unwelcome.

After the meeting I went down to as saltmarsh site beside Southampton Water to try to assist with a research project looking at the worrying rates of change along the eroding outer edged of the marshes. Large sections of The Solent coast has a margin of saltmarsh, this narrow strip of habitat has a whole suite of specialised species that live nowhere else. Unfortunately sea level rise and the lack of space for these habitats to migrate inland is meaning they are disappearing as they get squeezed out of existence.

The saltmarsh along Southampton Water is very diverse with lots of the characteristic species of these habitats. The outer edges have banks of shells known as cherniers which can smother the vegetation, if they kill leaving bare mud this can get more easily eroded although it can be recolonised by plants such as glasswort.

glasswort

glasswort colonising mud on the chernier edge

The lack of freshwater makes a saltmarsh somewhat similar to a very arid area and some of the adaptations are similar, for example fleshy and glaucous leaves.

sea purslane

sea purslane growing through the chernier bank

Inland from the shell banks the marshes are very flat, but still have variety in the form of creeks and subtle changes in elevation. These are enough to offer a variety of slightly different niches. In shorter areas sea-spurrey  can be common and its starry flowers are popular with the insects that also live out on the marshes.

sea spurrey

sea-spurrey flower

The higher areas of long-established marshes can have large areas of sea-lavender are very popular with insects and produce large swathes of colour.

sea lavender

sea-lavender in flower

Returning home I had time for a quick look at the meadow.

What’s in My Meadow Today?

There were several small skipper and a meadow brown or two in what is now a very dry meadow. Most of the grasses are brown or yellow, but the deeper rooted perennial herbs are still green and many in full flower. Wandering over the vegetation I found a 7-spot ladybird. This used to be our commonest larger ladybird, before the arrival of the harlequin ladybird from SE Asia, via the horticultural trade.

7 spot ladybird

7-spot ladybird

 

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30 Days Wild – Day 27: Location, Location, Location

After several days of the forecast promising rain in a couple of days, it finally arrived, although not yet in great quantity it is none the less welcome, so long as it does not get out of hand.

I have been running two moth traps at Blashford on several recent nights and it is remarkable how different the catches are. On trap is on the open ground beside the Centre and the other about 50m away under some trees. One of the most immediate differences that I notice when opening the traps is that the one close to the Centre has hawk-moths in it, that under the trees does not. Clearly the hawk-moths favour flying over open ground, perhaps their fast flight is just not suited to confined spaces, like trying to drag race around the streets of Fordingbridge. Under the trees there are many more smaller moths, is seems probably that they are actively avoiding the open spaces where their weak flight may mean they lose control over where they are going.  It has certainly been a lesson in importance of exact location in determining what is caught.

As a further illustration of the difference that location made is that the trap in the open caught 34 species, whilst the one under the trees 40 species, but there were only 18 species that were caught in both traps. Both have been run for the same time each night, coming on and going off at the same time, the effect would seem to be due to where they have been running. Open sites might be expected to catch less on windy nights but last night was not windy so this is unlikely to have been a factor and both sites are shaded from the morning sun, which might otherwise warm the moths and means some fly out of the trap, so lost moths can probably be discounted too. Clearly I will need to give more consideration to precisely where I put the trap in future as it would seem to be a very important factor determining what gets caught.