Some Moths and No Bins!

I ran the moth trap last night for the first time in a while and caught a dozen moths of five species, all typical early spring ones, but good to see for all that. The most frequent was common Quaker.common quaker

Next commonest was Hebrew character.hebrew character

Then small Quaker.small quaker

One thing that has not changed was the need to keep a close eye on the catch and keep it away from our resident robin.robin

There were also single clouded drab and early grey, but neither posed well for pictures.

Out on the reserve today the Woodland hide was busy with the usual good numbers of siskin, lesser redpoll, chaffinch and commoner woodland birds. When I was there I also saw 4 brambling and 7 reed bunting. It is always good to see the buntings as these are probably our nesting birds and feeding up well at this time of year has been shown to increase nesting success, important for a species that has been declining in recent years.

Out on the reserve reports received suggest that both of the black-necked grebe are still on Ibsley Water as was the Slavonian grebe. I saw a single adult Mediterranean gull, but I do not know if the ring-billed gull was seen today.

Near the Woodland hide there are quite  a lot of scarlet elf cup now, perhaps a little later than usual, but as bright as ever.scarlet elf cup

Although not as prominent as the many wild daffodil in the same area.wild daffodil

I spent the afternoon dealing with various odd jobs around the reserve. Although it was dry and quite pleasant the reserve was relatively quiet so I took the opportunity of the low traffic to fill in a few more of the pot holes in the entrance track, there are still quite a few but it is getting better.

Unfortunately towards the end of the day I realised that, at some point in the afternoon, I had put down my binoculars and as hard as I looked I could not find them anywhere. Although now rather battered I will be very sad if they do not turn up, they have been my constant companions for pretty much every day of the last twenty plus years, lots of birds seen through good times and bad. If you happen to see a lost looking pair of binoculars, please let me know!

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7 thoughts on “Some Moths and No Bins!

  1. Ohhh! I do hope you find your binoculars. More lovely daffodils to lift the spirits! I saw them for myself when I visited on Feb 15, and the snowdrops. Still haven’t seen the grebe. Maybe they’ll be there when I visit at Easter?

  2. Sorry to hear about the bins. Are visitors able to see the moths/moth trap if they happen to visit on a day after the trap’s been out?

    • We usually put assign on the trap if we are using it for an education event or otherwise need it undisturbed. Normally it will be fine to look through it once we have done our list of species. We just ask that you try not to allow any to fly off an d put them back in the trap when you have finished. Oh, and beware of the robin, which will take unguarded moths, given the chance.

  3. Thank you for the update. Hope you find your bins soon, I know how very attached we can become to them. Your binoculars are like your best friend, all seeing, and always give you the bigger picture on life! I would hate to be without mine.

  4. Hi Robert. Sorry you’ve lost your bins. I have a pair of Ajax 10×50 field glasses which I will happily donate to you /Blashford Lakes. Although not ideal they’re better than nothing. However, I won’t be coming over from Swanage until next w/e. Let me know. Regards Nick. p.s. If you’ve found your bins or replaced them perhaps you could use these at the centre to loan out on occasions? >

    • Thanks for the offer Nick, I do have another pair, I was just rather attached to my trusty old Leicas and they were so old that I did not mind taking them everywhere with me. We do have binoculars we loan out on walks and at education events so if you are looking for a home for your old ones we might be able to give them a home.
      Bob

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