Lunar yellow blunder wing

Yesterday a Lunar yellow underwing moth turned up into the moth trap. Not much to look at but probably the rarest moth I’ve ever seen. Unfortunately it also turned out to be one of the most irritating moths I’ve ever seen and refused to keep still for a photograph, the two photos here are the best I could manage despite giving it an extended cool down in the fridge. Shortly after taking the second photo it flew off straight into a spider’s web high on the side of the education centre then managed to free itself and headed off into the woodland never to be seen again. Lunar yellow underwing’s main British population is in the Breckland area of Norfolk and Suffolk, with a few scattered populations else where. Here at Blashford we think they inhabit the lichen heath area by Ivy North hide as a few adults have been recorded over the years but so far we have not been able to prove this.

Lunar yellow underwing

Lunar yellow underwing

Lunar yellow underwing

This afternoon volunteer Ollie and I went to check the ponies grazing by Ibsley Water, afterwards we had a quick look out of Lapwing hide and it was pleasing to see a little egret, 2 grey herons and a few lapwing feeding in an area of fen and grassland that Adam and I had strimmed back last week.

little egret

little egret

Afterwards we did some more ragwort pulling (really sick of pulling ragwort now!) and Ollie spotted a pink grasshopper. It turned out to be a pink form of field grasshopper, a species that can be identified by the downy hairs on the underside of the thorax, just visible in the photo below. Field is furry is how I like to remember it.

pink form of field grasshopper

pink form of field grasshopper

Ollie ragwort pulling

Ollie ragwort pulling

Thank you to Mark Wright for sending us the four photos below of a blue-tailed damselfly, a common tern feeding it’s chick and a emperor dragonfly egg laying.

blue-tailed damselfly

blue-tailed damselfly

Common tern feeding young

Common tern feeding chick, Ivy lake

Can anyone identify the fish the adult tern is feeding the chick? I think it is some sort of loach or gudgeon?

common tern 2

Common tern feeding chick

The emperor dragonfly has a blue damselfly sat on it’s back, probably quite a safe place as emperors will eat damselflies given the chance.

Emperor dragonfly

Emperor dragonfly

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